Kindle Unlimited Book Fair


April 10-13 🌸 New Giveaways Daily

https://bookwrapt.com/spring-ku-book-fair

Are you a member of Kindle Unlimited? Looking for some a-ma-zing new reads? Visit our book fair for a massive shelf’s worth of page-turning books to download for free in contemporary romance, paranormal romance, thrillers, fantasy, science fiction, women’s fiction, romantic suspense, erotic romance, and more.

Plus, we’re giving away a $20 Amazon gift card each day!

Don’t have a KU subscription? You can still shop our fair for binge-worthy books, plus search the fair for Amazon instant book giveaways hosted daily! Look for Books from Your Favorite Authors!

Alyson Hale • Barbara Lohr • Bethany Strobel • Betty Shreffler • Brenda Whiteside • Carrie Pulkinen • Carrie Whitethorne • Catty Diva • Dani Haviland • Dee Stone • Denise Devine • Emma Alisyn • Erzabet Bishop • Gina Kincade • Holly Cortelyou • Honey Phillips • J.E. Parker • Jacquie Biggar • Jen Davis • Jim Stein • Jina Bacarr • Joan Reeves • Judith Starkston • Karina Kantas • Kerri Keberly • Laura A. Barnes • Leah Ashton • Lisa B. Thomas • LM Preston • Lori Sjoberg • Lucy Lakestone • Margaret Tanner • Marlow Kelly • Melissa McClone • Morgan K Wyatt • N.D. Jones • Nancy C. Weeks • Northern Lights Writers • Regine Abel • Rose Pearson • Soraya Naomi • Stephanie Queen • Tara Gallina • Taylor Marsh • Theresa Paolo • Aileen Harkwood

Sneak peek, anyone?

So I got the sweetest message from a reader last week. They reached out to tell me they missed Eros, and how excited they are for the next book(s) in the series.

You guys, that really, really made my day.

In fact, it might have made my whole month because I had just recently been wondering if I’d started book one in the wrong place. I was driving myself cray-cray with all the woulda, coulda, shoulda.

But then this lovely little ray of sunshine took the time to tell me they missed my gooey cinnamon roll beta bae, Eros, and how I’ve become one of their favorite authors. I swear to you I almost fell over. Me? Someone’s favorite? How is that even possible? I’m not sure, but I’ll take it.

LIZ: She’s someone’s fav author now? *rolls eyes* Whatever.
LEO: Well, she did write us into existence, love.
LIZ: Shut it, Don Juan. P.S. I love you.

So, Nath… thank you. Here is a sneak peek of the prequel novella to The Business of Love you’ve been patiently waiting for. Also? It’s (mostly) unedited… and my first attempt at an omniscient narrator… who breaks the fourth wall…

BEHIND SCHEDULE

The beginning of the end for Cupid

This is a story about a boy and a girl, fated to be together. Is it a love story? Yes, most definitely. In fact, it’s three. Is there a happily ever after? Not yet. Not for a long time. Centuries, I’m afraid, and although the two souls in this tale are granted a new life each time, love can never quite hit the mark. 

Love, what a precious thing . . . horrible timing, though.  

Indulge me one question before I begin. I’m curious. Do you believe in fate? Oh, I know that look. You’re not quite sure. I admit, it’s not a concept most can hang their hat on. But I feel you’re a trustworthy soul, so I’m going to share a secret with you.

Life is a tapestry, and Fate—the youngest, if you believe in that sort of thing—knots the strands of will, intention, and choice together to give one’s destiny shape. What most don’t understand is, although the threads of why and when that are cast upon the cosmic loom aren’t your decision, the patterns that emerge are—the how can be whatever you make it.

But I digress, and I can see you’re growing impatient. You’re a hopeless romantic, aren’t you? I can tell. I am, too. I like stories with happy endings, and I always root for love. Still, there are some who aren’t so moved by matters of the heart as you or I. The jealous types, and I’d bet donuts to dollars they’re also the ones who think Fate is a cruel mistress.

Well, if you ask me, I’ll tell you Fate isn’t cruel at all. She just can’t bring order to chaos alone. It’s too heavy a load. She’s got three sides, you know, and wears more than one face to carry out what has to be done. All things must have balance, and while one face doles out endings, another hands out beginnings. Then there’s the face that has to be conscious of time. Calculations, measurements, numbers—how long before this happens or that. It’s necessary, you see, because time is precious. Lives must be limited, so that other souls can have a chance.

Yes, so many souls, so little time . . . but enough of my rambling, let’s get on with the first story.

A long, long time ago, two brand new souls were fated to be bound together by love. But the powers that be decided, against The Fates’ orders, mind you, that love was not to have a fair shot…

Cupid’s going KU + other news

Hey, hey. I realize it’s been a while. Life has a way of keeping us… er… busy, doesn’t it? Still lots of stuff going on at the Word Factory, though, and, as such, I have news!

But first…

Some of you may have noticed, most of you probably haven’t, but it’s been near radio silence on social media from me for the past month. I’m not going to beat around the bush, here. I’ve been served some rather large shit sandwiches lately, and the only way I know how to keep my mental health in order is to ghost all things distracting.

Ghostly as I’ve been, I’m still moving forward with book two and the prequel novella. Not going to lie, it’s been difficult because there are other things that need to take precedence right now, which, oh how convenient, brings me to my first bit of news.

I am now offering copy editing + proofreading

YOU: But are you qualified?

ME: I’m glad you asked. Yes!

I’ve been an advertising copywriter for over twenty years, and have worked closely with industry professionals of multiple disciplines, including proofreaders. I’ve also supervised and mentored other copywriters, so I’m no stranger to editing, my friends… Or correct grammar, punctuation and spelling. It was my day job for years.

Fast forward to the part where I’ve been running a successful freelance business for over six years. You can check out my LinkedIn profile for some endorsements and recommendations regarding my word ninja skills and work ethic here.

In addition to freelance copywriting, I’ve critiqued and beta read many manuscripts over the last four years. I’m working on getting some testimonials for you, but until then, you’ll just have to believe me when I say I’m a fan of the Oxford comma and a bonafide member of the Plausibility Police.

YOU: I don’t know. I’m still not convinced.

ME: No problem. I’ll do a 3-page copy edit or proofread for you. If you don’t think I’m up to snuff, you’re under no obligation to work with me.

If you’re interested, or know someone who’s looking for budget-friendly yet thorough copy edits or proofreading, you can check out my rates here.

BONUS: I’ll be giving peeps who book by March 31st a 20% discount!

In other news…

The Business of Love will be available in KU beginning April 1st.

Yep. Cupid is going Kindle Unlimited so now you can read for free! Don’t worry, if you don’t subscribe to KU you can still one-click The Business of Love for just $2.99.

Did you hear that, Eros? We’re going KU!
That’s all I’ve got for now, folks. If you’re not already on my mailing list, and you’d like to join, you can sign up here. Next letter drops at the beginning of April!

The Olympians: Aphrodite, goddess of bombshells.

Hesiod declares that Aphrodite, the goddess of love, beauty and pleasure, was born off the coast of Cythera from the foam produced by Uranus’s genitals, which had been severed and thrown into the sea by his son Cronus (Um, dude clearly had control issues). Homer claimed she was Zeus and Dione’s daughter. Wallpaper art by Psycofairy

Personally, I’m going with Zeus’s daughter on this one because the goddess of love and beauty was also the goddess of pleasure. Based on the many trysts she had, with both gods and mortals, it seems as though girlfriend had a wandering eye. This lead to her often being unfaithful to her husband Hepheastus, most notably with Ares, the god of war.

Speaking of Ares, Eros is said to be the son of Aphrodite and Ares, but that’s only one of a few origin stories for Cupid. It’s also said that Eros was one of the primeval forces born at the beginning of time. Whatever the case may be, Eros was a constant companion of Aphrodite.

It’s obvious innocent-looking Aphrodite had a wild side. As such, she found herself in the middle of her fair share of drama, like being the catalyst for the Trojan War, an obsession with the mortal Anchises (Pronounced ann-KY-seez), and that whole custody battle over Adonis.

And now for the anger myths…

Ah, yes, the “anger myths”, which is also why I’m going with Zeus as being her father. Zeus is notoriously hot-tempered (all of Cronus’s sons are, in fact), so it makes sense.

In one myth,  Aphrodite gets supremely pissed at the women on the island of Lemnos because they refuse to worship and make sacrifices to her. She  promptly curses them to stink so horribly their husbands will no longer have sex with them. The men start having relations with their slave girls instead and, in a murderous rage, the women kill all the men on the island. The woman eventually repent, and when Jason and his Argonauts land on the island, Aphrodite agrees to lift the curse. I’m pretty sure nothing got done for a full week when that shiz went down.

“No worship, no sexy time.” ~Aphrodite

Another myth has Aphrodite getting bent out of shape because Hippolytus (Pronounced hip-POL-lah-tus) worships Artemis, the virgin goddess. Of course, being the goddess of sexuality, Aphrodite is irritated to no end. She declares he has directly challenged her authority by abstaining from sex, and curses Hippolytus’s stepmother to fall in love with him, knowing he will reject her. Sure enough, he rejects her and she commits suicide, but not before leaving a note to Hippolytus’s father, Theseus (Pronounced THEE-see-us), that Hippolytus tried to force her to sleep with him. Theseus prays to Poseidon to kill Hippolytus. Always looking for a fight, the god of the sea obliges. He sends a wild bull to spook Hippolytus’s horses as the mortal rides along the shore in his chariot. The horses bolt, smashing his chariot against the cliffs and the rest is too bloody and gory to think about.

Yet anther myth where Aphrodite’s nasty side comes out is concerning Gluacus, the son of Sisyphus (Prounounced SIS-ee-fus). He apparently kept his racing mares from mating to preserve their speed, and this did not set well with Aphrodite. She sought retribution on him by driving his horses mad until they turned on Hippolytus and tore him apart.

 

Flower symbol of Aphrodite.

Despite Aphrodites’ two sides, she was beautiful and enchanting beyond compare. Perhaps her dual nature was what made her so desirable yet unattainable. Some of her symbols include a magical girdle, made for her by her adoring husband, Hephaestus, god of blacksmithing, metal work, craftsmen and artisans, a shell, doves, sparrows, roses, and myrtles.

 

 

 

Kerri

Not on my subscriber list yet? SIGN UP HERE and get a bonus deleted scene from The Business of Love, the first book in the Eros & Co. series out early 2019!

The Olympians: Dionysus, drunken mess extraordinaire.

Dionysus was the god of the grape harvest, wine and winemaking, fertility, ritual madness, religious ecstasy and theater. Basically, dude liked to party.

It’s no wonder, to be honest. Poor Dion never got a chance to meet his mother, Semele (I talked about her demise in my previous post). Apparently, however, what he did get was his father’s penchant for unrestrained consumption.

Speaking of Zeus, upon his latest son’s entry into the world, he gave Dionysus to Hermes. Hermes was, uh, probably not the best god to raise a kid. For one thing, he was extremely busy traveling, delivering and psychopomping. So Hermes pawned baby Dion off on his mortal aunt, with strict instructions to dress the boy as a girl to keep him hidden from Hera. It was probably for the best, buuuuut…

Yeah, if the god of wine’s drunken and debauched lifestyle says anything at all, it’s I HAVE ABANDONMENT ISSUES, OKAY? It seems he was destined to drink the pain away.

Nonetheless, he found purpose in chaos, danger, and the unexpected. So he pretty much encouraged poor decision making, which was why he was the god mortals turned to when they needed a break from reality (and sanity). His wine and ecstatic dancing freed his followers to lose their inhibitions, forget their fears and throw self-consciousness to the wind. In a nutshell, Dion didn’t GAF about acting like a stone cold crazy hot mess, he just wanted everyone to have a good time.

“It is called liquid courage, my friends. *hiccup* You’re welcome.” ~Dionysus

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ladies loved Dionysus. And why wouldn’t they? He encouraged drinking, dancing, and unbridled fits of passion. Plus, being a god, and, let’s not forget, son of super buff Zeus, he probably looked pretty damned good while doing it.

“I just died. K, thx, byyyyye.” ~Me

 

Dionysus had many cults dedicated to worshipping him, the best known among his followers being the Maenads. They’d do anything for Dion. Like, anything. Including, but not limited to wild dancing, clawing at the dirt like maniacs, and uprooting trees with their bare hands. Also with their bare hands? Ripping apart bulls, the symbol of their beloved god, and eating the flesh raw.

Eww. No thanks. I’d never make it into the Maenads Only club, since my idea of a wild night is a couple of wine spritzers and a face full of sliders during an episode of Game of Thrones.

 

let’s talk Hook ups…

It wasn’t just the ladies that loved Dionysus. The gentlemen took a shine to him as well, especially the young satyr Ampelos. Dionysus fancied him back, but Ampelos was killed trying to ride a wild bull to impress him. Oops.

There was also Polymnos, a mortal who showed Dionysus the way into the Underworld. In return, he asked Dion to lie with him. When Dionysus finally got around to fulfilling the pledge he’d made, Polymnos had already died. So Dionysus erected a wooden phallus on his grave. And, yes, that pun was intended.

As for the ladies, Dionysus had many love affairs, with goddesses, nymphs, and mortals, but the most well known of his love affairs was with Ariadne, a mortal princess of Krete. He found her sleeping on the island of Naxos and made her his wife. As the story goes, however, Dionysus wasn’t her first choice. Ariadne fell in love with Theseus, the man who’d come to slay the Minotaur, and even went so far as to help him kill the beast. Afterward, she fled with Theseus to his boat… but he abandoned her as she slept, leaving her behind. That’s when Dion swooped in with his sparkly abs, two wine glasses and a charcuterie plate.

Anyhoodle, that’s about it for Dionysus. Other than he was the last god to be named an Olympian, he was the only god to have a mortal mother.

 

Kerri

Not on my subscriber list yet? SIGN UP HERE and get a bonus deleted scene from The Business of Love, the first book in the Eros & Co. series out early 2019!

The Olympians: Hera, queen of the king of gods.

Daughter of Titans, wife of Zeus, goddess of marriage…holder of grudges. To say Hera was an intimidating diety would be an understatement. Although her notoriously proud and stoic demeanor seems to have been her nature, the more I read about her, the more I discovered that this vengeful figure of Greek mythology had more than a little help getting that way.

Let’s start at the beginning, when Hera had nothing but love for both animals and other beings. There she was,  just living her best life, in her boldly righteous way, when her brother, Zeus, king of the gods, decided that maybe he wanted to get with all that.

Actually, there was no maybe about it. It took six wives before Zeus realized a strong king needed a strong queen by his side, and now that he discovered the obvious choice had been right in front of him the whole time, he had to have her.  The problem was, she was as serious about her virtue as she was about her opinions. Basically, girlfriend had better things to do than to play second fiddle to Zeus, and he knew it.  Also? She’d never agree to an unwed roll in the hay. So, he tricked her.

Using her soft side against her, Zeus turned himself into a cuckoo during a storm and then flapped around helplessly outside her window. Of course, Hera rescued the poor little bird, pulling him into the safety of her breast. Once tucked against her, you guessed it, Zeus turned back into his big, brawny self and overpowered her. Hera did not take it well. To add insult to injury, Zeus informed her that, now that they’d done the deed, she was his seventh wife.

Naturally, she was enraged at being told what she was and was not, but she was as cunning as she was beautiful and saw a way to come out the winner. Do you want to know why I think she finally agreed to marry Zeus? Payback.

“Look me in the eyes, bro… Do. Not. Test. Me.” ~Hera

There’s no greater proof that Hera and Zeus’s relationship was dysfunctional from the get go than their infamous squabbles. Maybe it was the thrill of the fight, but the more Hera got pissed at him, the more Zeus had hearts in his eyes for her. The meaner she was, the more he liked it, and she could be downright awful. It’s said that even the king of gods (yep, the one who could wield lightning) would cower when Hera was in one of her moods.

Case in point: She blinded the priest Tiresias when he sided with Zeus over who receives more sexual pleasure, a man or a woman. Poor Tiresias said women did, nine times more. This caused Hera to lose the argument… and her shit. She thought it only right Tiresias lose his eyesight on account that if he didn’t see things her way, he wouldn’t see them at all.

 

Revenge is a dish best served cold…

Hera had several children by Zeus, so she wasn’t a prude. She was, however, a stickler when it came to fidelity. In fact, Hera was involved in so many divine bar fights over her man’s wandering eye, to list them all would make this a very long post. Here are the cliff notes on but a few:

One of Hera’s more well-known beefs was with the goddess, Leto, Zeus’s sixth wife. Hera did a bunch of things to prevent the birth of twins Artemis and Apollo, including kidnapping Eileithya, goddess of childbirth, so that Leto could not go into labor. This was in addition to the world-wide ban that stated Leto could not give birth anywhere under the sun on “terra firma”, the mainland. The twins were eventually born, but Hera was not happy about it.

Next up is Lo. In order to hide his sexcapades with the beautiful mortal, Zeus turned Lo into a white heifer. Hera was not fooled, however, and demanded that Zeus give the heifer to her as a gift. To avoid dealing with her wrath, he handed over the cow. Hera then had Argus, to whom she gave 100 eyes, watch over Lo so Zeus couldn’t change her back.

And then there was Alcmene, another one of Zeus’s lovers. When Hera found out how excited Zeus was that the world would soon have another hero, Hera went into Oh Hell No mode. After seven days and nights of agony, Alcmene stretched out her arms and called upon Eileithyia. While Eileithyia did go to Alcmene, she was instructed by Hera to clasp her hands tight in order to prevent the birth. Galanthis, a maid of Alcmene, observed Eileithyia’s behaviour and, to put an end to her mistress’s suffering, announced that Alcmene had safely delivered the baby. This surprised Eileithyia so much she unclenched her hands, releasing Alceme from the spell long enough for Hercules to actually be born. As punishment for deceiving Eileithyia, Hera transformed Galanthis into a weasel.

When Hera discovered Semele, another mortal who Zeus was sleeping with, was pregnant, she disguised herself as an old crone and visited the girl. When Semele confirmed that her lover was indeed Zeus, Hera planted the seeds of doubt in her mind, which led Semele to asking Zeus to grant her a wish. Eager to please, Zeus agreed, but when Semele said her wish was for Zeus to reveal himself to her in all his glory as proof of his divinity, he begged her to change her mind. She could not be persuaded, and so Zeus was forced to show his true form to her… and she done burnt to a crisp right there on the spot.

Zeus did manage to save his unborn child and sew him into his thigh, though. And that, my friends, was how Dionysus was born. If you know anything about the god of wine, you know he led a rather debauched life, full of wine, sex and crazy demented groupies called maenads. But more on Dion in the next post.

Where the wine flows like… pee?

So there you have it. Some of the reasons why Hera is depicted as a matron with a mad case of resting bitch face. I dunno. I kind of don’t blame her. Do you?

 

Kerri

Not on my subscriber list yet? SIGN UP HERE and get a bonus deleted scene from The Business of Love, the first book in the Eros & Co. series out early 2019!